The Easy Part is Over

The first five lessons of the Writers Master Class by James Patterson are pretty basic, except that you get his insight which is pretty valuable. If you have ever taken a writing class then these will be familiar to you. Rather than list the lessons for you I will simply provide the link to the Master Class

Lessons 6 and 7 are about outlining and James Patterson provides his outline to "Honeymoon". One may argue that if you see one outline, you have seen them all, but one must remember this man has made a lot of money writing, so he may have some material worth studying.

The Outline is fascinating, but more to the point is the outline development. His key mantra here is "tell the story". So here I sit looking at a book I am pretty much familiar with, the one I am writing, not his. I have a sort of outline, but after seeing the one he has for "Honeymoon" I can see that if I take the time to develop a really good outline then the book will be better.


Jonas Watcher
The Case of the Jade Dragon

Outline by Gene Poschman


Chapter 1 - The Tale of a Dragon

Jonas Watcher is returning home from New Orleans by train. He meets an elderly Chinese  gentleman and his daughter. They are later accosted by ruffians and Jonas dispatches them efficiently. The elderly gentleman is impressed and asks Jonas' occupation. He is interested in the fact that Jonas is a private detective. His daughter is concerned in her father's interest.

Chapter 2 - An Impolite Invitation

Jonas is in his office...


"Honeymoon" seems to have over a hundred chapters, so I guess I am just getting started. James Patterson says he can be working an outline for a month or more. I have most of the story in place and I will continue to report on my progress with the class, so there may be some disjointed posts, but I will keep them as logical as possible.

Gene Poschman






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